Finding Tennis Shoes with Wide Widths (2E, 3E, 4E)

Some shoes for players with rather wide feet

(with multi-view pictures of shoes --- sides, bottom, etc.)

(2008 Feb blog post)

I may change or augment this blog post in the future ---
to add some shoe models, or to clarify some points, or
to add web links to guide the reader to further information.

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Introduction

I had a bad experience in ordering a pair of Adidas tennis shoes via Internet pictures. There was no place I could go to try on the model that looked most suitable for me.

I found out, the hard way, that the shoes were very narrow. Whenever I played tennis, those Adidas shoes mercilessly rubbed the outsides of my feet --- at the outer bones near the base of my little toes. The shoes had a fairly flexible mesh top but, even with that, there was simply not enough "give" in the shoe to accomodate my fairly wide foot.

I have been finding that many sports shoes nowadays, that are made in Asia (and almost all are), tend to be narrow (or short for the labelled length). Some brands, like Reebok, seem to be generous in width (and length), across most of their models. But some, like Adidas, seem to be narrow. A 'D' width in one brand may be quite different from a 'D' width in another brand.

Given these varying differences between actual width (or length) and labelled width (or length), my advice would be to find a store that has the model you like (or, failing that, a store with a good choice of models) and try on the tennis shoes you like (stand up and walk around in them) before buying.

Unfortunately, chain sporting goods stores, like Sports Authority and Dick's Sporting Goods, stock only two or three models of tennis shoes --- and Dick's (in our area) does not stock any tennis shoes in winter months. So, to get a good idea of the choices out there, I found that I need to search the internet.

    (I have been able to find running shoes that suit my bow-legged, "supinating" running style --- in the shoe department of Kohl's department store and in the discount shoe chain Off Broadway Shoes --- for prices about $15 below the TSRP = Typical Suggested Retail Price. Unfortunately, those stores seldom stock men's tennis shoes, and when they do, there is not much choice of brands and models.)

The only brand that seems to offer a variety of widths (B, D, 2E, 4E) for most of their models seems to be New Balance. Wilson seems to offer two widths for some of their models (regular and 3E). Occasionally I have found a Reebok model in two widths (regular and 4E). I have seen some ads for ASICS athletic shoes that claim they offer wide widths in some models, but it is hard to find a site that sells wide ASICS tennis shoes. (Apparently ASICS provides wide running shoes, but seldom provides wide tennis shoes.) Some Prince shoes are offered in medium and wide (M and W) widths.

The typical brands of tennis shoes are, in alphabetical order, Adidas, ASICS, Babolat, Diadora, Fila, K-Swiss, New Balance, Nike, Prince, Reebok, Wilson, and Yonex. I plan to do occasional web searches and provide pictures, below, of brands and models of tennis shoes that offer wide widths.

The rows of pictures below summarize what I have found so far.

In some cases, the text, below some of these shoe pictures, provides a link to a site-webpage that is (or was) a source of that model of shoe.

CLICK on any of the images to see a larger image.

And click on the Back button of your browser to return to this page, after viewing the large image.



New Balance
CT1002

width 2E
(and D and 4E)

TSRP = $70
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

New Balance
CT1200

width 2E
(and D)

TSRP = $100
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

New Balance
MC803W

width 2E
 

TSRP = $72
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

New Balance
CT822

width 2E
(and D)

TSRP = $68
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

New Balance
MC654

width 2E
(and D and 4E)

TSRP = $65
 

 
 

 
 

 
 


New Balance
MC781WS

width 2E
(and D)

TSRP = $64
 
N/A
 
 

 
 

 
 

New Balance
CT780NV

width 2E
(and D and 4E)

TSRP = $70
=> $56

 
 

 
 

 
 

New Balance
CT653WT

width 2E
(and D and 4E)

TSRP = $55
=> $44

 
 

 
 

 
 


ASICS Gel
Challenger

ASICS Gel
Resolution

ASICS Gel
Velocity

ASICS Gel
Encourage

ASICS Gel
Encourage

ASICS Gel
Encourage


Wilson
Topseed

Wilson
Topseed

Wilson
Topseed

Wilson
Challenge 2

Wilson
Challenge 2

Wilson
Challenge 2


Prince
MV4

Summary :

New Balance offers the most variety in widths --- B, D, EE, and EEEE (4E) in some shoes.

ASICS has a few attractive shoes. They look more flexible in contrast to the stiff-looking shoes of most competitors. But they only offer 'D' size.

To TRY to avoid tight shoes, one would have to order a length about 1/2-size to a full-size larger than one would wear if a wider width were available. This strategy seldom seems to work, for me.

Wilson offers a few '3E' width shoes. But the quality and style are not very impressive.

Prince offers Medium and Wide (M and W) in one or two models. But there is not much choice there. The total number of Prince models is relatively small, compared to Adidas, Nike, and New Balance.

You would think that Adidas and Nike would offer some width variation, since they almost have the professional tennis player market to themselves. You would think that some of those tennis professionals would demand some width options. Do they all have narrow-to-medium width feet?? If I were a top professional, I would probably be wearing New Balance rather than Adidas or Nike --- because of the width options.

And there is just not any apparent width-choice available from Fila, Yonex, and Diadora. And not much appealing from K-Swiss. Their shoes look clunky and stiff --- and offer only one width.

Come on, Adidas and Nike --- and ASICS! Do you really think one-width fits all??! Give us some width choice!


Strangely, there does not seem to be much information on tennis shoes at the vendor sites --- at least, Google does not take us to the Adidas/ASICS/Nike/etc. company sites when we search for 'tennis shoes wide widths'.

Perhaps this is because their big sellers are running, soccer, and basketball shoes. Most of their attention and advertising is devoted to those shoes.

It seems it is easier to get information on tennis shoes from the web sites of mail-order distributors, like

The number of name-brand tennis shoes (and models) that are available from local stores (in southeast Virginia) can be counted on one hand. Pretty disgusting.

I have a list of web sites of tennis gear suppliers, like the several above, on a Tennis Links page at the home page of this site. Hopefully, more width options will become available at the tennis mail-order sites in the next few years --- that is, 2009-2011.

If you get frustrated trying to find what you want by doing web searches, you might want to try this shoe finder at Tennis Warehouse. It is restricted to what Tennis Warehouse stocks, but Tennis Warehouse stocks a major portion of the models of the major brands.

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Page was created 2008 Feb 05.Page was created 2008 Jan 22.
Added page breaks for better printing 2009 Aug 18.
Minor format changes 2013 Apr 18.