Tennis Strings
for
Spin

(3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8-sided
& other 'shaped' strings)

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INTRODUCTION:

This page is meant to provide lists of many 'shaped' tennis strings that are designed to facilitate putting spin on the tennis ball.

The lists of strings are presented below in sections for strings of various cross-sectional 'shapes':

  • 3-sided (triangular)
  • 4-sided (square)
  • 5-sided (pentagonal)
  • 6-sided (hexagonal)
  • 7-sided (heptagonal)
  • 8-sided (octagonal)
  • and other shapes

These are 'polyester' strings or 'co-poly' strings (polyester strings with additives) --- NOT 'gut' or 'multi-filament' (nylon) or 'synthetic gut' (multi-filament with a relatively large polyester core filament).

This page is mainly devoted to 'poly' strings, but there are links on this page to information on the other types of strings.

You can jump to each section (on this page) using the menu-of-links below.

The name of each string is a link to a WEB SEARCH on that name --- to provide historical and/or up-to-date information on that string.

Each string-name starts with the maker-name of the string.

In each section, the strings are in alphanumeric order by name. Hence they are grouped by maker-name.


String 'Stiffness':

Below each string-name is its stiffness (k) which is "how many pounds force are necessary to stretch the string lengthwise by one inch during a dynamic impact".

These values are taken from the Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'String Stiffness Tool'.

The units of measure are pounds-per-inch (lb/in).

The stiffness values generally range from 74 to about 314 lb/in.

"Measurements were made with string reference tension of 52 lb with a swing speed for a 120 mph serve."

    The TWU leaves out details of the stiffness measurement.

    Questions are unanswered, such as:

      How long was the string in the measurement?
      (Did they compensate for the length?)

      How were the pounds force of the serve determined?

      Was it a simulated serve, not an actual serve?

      The string probably did not stretch a full inch, so was the ratio determined by dividing less-than-an-inch into the pounds force to get the stiffness ratio?

    We may never know answers to these questions.

    You can try web searches for more detailed info on how string stiffness is actually measured.

Some of the following strings are not in the Tennis Warehouse database, so the stiffness (k) is simply shown as a question mark.

If you want a 'cushy' feeling string, you will probably want a string with relatively low stiffness.

If you want a string that does not absorb a lot of energy from the ball's momentum, you may want a stiffer string.


String 'Thickness':

Many of these strings come in several different gauges (thicknesses).

Generally, the higher gauges (smaller thicknesses) have a lower stiffness than the lower gauges (bigger thicknesses) --- but not always (perhaps due to differences in material used).

For simplicity, the stiffness (k) is shown for a single gauge (thickness) of each string.

The thickness of some strings is designated as a 'gauge number'. Some are reported in 'mm' (millimeters). And some are reported both ways --- on packaging and elsewhere.

The 'gauge number' thickness assigned is not always the same number of millimeters (even from the same manufacturer), but the gauge number is usually within a few one-hundredths millimeters of the following numbers.

  • Gauge 15 is approximately 1.40 mm
  • Gauge 15L is approximately 1.35 mm
  • Gauge 16 is approximately 1.30 mm
  • Gauge 16L is approximately 1.28 mm
  • Gauge 17 is approximately 1.25 mm
  • Gauge 17L is approximately 1.22 mm
  • Gauge 18 is approximately 1.19 mm
  • Gauge 18L is approximately 1.16 mm
  • Gauge 19 is approximately 1.13 mm
  • Gauge 20 is approximately 1.10 mm

If you want a 'cushy' feeling string, you will probably want a string with low thickness (high gauge) --- because it may deform more easily than a thicker string.

If you want a string that does not absorb a lot of energy from the ball's momentum, you may want a thicker string (lower gauge) --- because it may be more resistant to deformation.


String 'Spin-Potential':

Below each string-name is its spin-potential (SP) which is the "ratio of string-on-ball coefficient of friction, COF, divided by string-on-string COF".

These values are taken from the Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) String 'Spin Potential Tool'.

You can see that page for further discussion of the how-and-why of 'spin potential'.

The ratio generally ranges from 1.2 to about 11.9.

Most gut strings are at the low end of this range --- about 1.2 to 3.0.

Most polyester strings are at the high end of this range --- about 3.0 to 11.9.

You can use the

to see the
string-on-ball coefficient-of-friction, say SB-COF,
and the
string-on-string coefficient-of-friction, say SS-COF, respectively.

To get lots of spin, it makes sense that we want the SB-COF to be HIGH, so that the (main) strings really 'grab' the ball.

AND, assuming the main & cross strings of the racquet are the same make, it makes sense that we want the SS-COF to be LOW, so that the main-strings slide easily on the cross-strings, thus springing back up after deforming downward --- thus helping grab the ball even more --- and launching it on a spinning-and-arching path, rather than a more linear path (with relatively little spin).

Since 'Spin-Potential' is SB-COF divided by SS-COF, we see that the Spin-Potential is larger when SB-COF is high & SS-COF is low.

So Spin-Potential is a way of judging a string's spin potential using one number rather than two.

However, one may wish to judge a string by considering one COF more than the other, so it may be helpful to look at SB-COF and SS-COF individually.

In the lists below, we generally show SB-COF and SS-COF, as well as SP = Spin Potential.

    NOTE:
    Although the SS-COF of a string may be low (and thus slide easily across the other strings), the string may not deform much if it is very stiff (non-stretchy). So you may need to take into account the stiffness of the string.

    AND,
    although the SS-COF of a string may be low, it may not deform much if the string is strung at very high tension. So you may need to take into account the tension of the string --- and how hard you strike the ball.

    (Choosing your weapons in tennis is a complex endeavor ; there are so many string-and-racquet factors to consider.)


String 'Tension':
(pounds & kilograms)

After you have decided on a string and a string-thickness, there is still the matter of choosing the tension at which to string the racquet.

For people who have elbow or shoulder or wrist problems, they may want to use a low tension.

On the other hand, 'big bangers', capable of fast-and-powerful ground strokes, may want a high tension because they can direct their shots more precisely and with less scatter.

There are tennis pro's who use very low tensions --- and there are pro's who use very high tensions --- ranging from tensions around 25 pounds (Mannarino, Kukuskin) through 35 pounds (Jack Sock) up to about 70 pounds (Dustin Brown).

Nowadays (circa 2022), many of the top pro's use tensions of about 55 pounds (Federer, Djokovic, Nadal, Murray). And tensions used for polyester strings are trending downward, toward 45 pounds.

In Europe, players tend to specify their string tension in kilograms rather than pounds.

The following table can be used to convert pounds to kilograms --- or kilograms to pounds. For example, 22 kilograms is about 48 pounds.

  • 20 lb = 9.07 kg
  • 21 lb = 9.53 kg
  • 22 lb = 9.98 kg
  • 23 lb = 10.43 kg
  • 24 lb = 10.89 kg
  • 25 lb = 11.34 kg
  • 26 lb = 11.79 kg
  • 27 lb = 12.25 kg
  • 28 lb = 12.70 kg
  • 29 lb = 13.15 kg
  • 30 lb = 13.61 kg
  • 31 lb = 14.06 kg
  • 32 lb = 14.51 kg
  • 33 lb = 14.97 kg
  • 34 lb = 15.42 kg
  • 35 lb = 15.88 kg
  • 36 lb = 16.33 kg
  • 37 lb = 16.78 kg
  • 38 lb = 17.24 kg
  • 39 lb = 17.69 kg
  • 40 lb = 18.14 kg
  • 41 lb = 18.60 kg
  • 42 lb = 19.05 kg
  • 43 lb = 19.50 kg
  • 44 lb = 19.96 kg
  • 45 lb = 20.41 kg
  • 46 lb = 20.86 kg
  • 47 lb = 21.32 kg
  • 48 lb = 21.77 kg
  • 49 lb = 22.23 kg
  • 50 lb = 22.68 kg
  • 51 lb = 23.13 kg
  • 52 lb = 23.59 kg
  • 53 lb = 24.04 kg
  • 54 lb = 24.49 kg
  • 55 lb = 24.95 kg
  • 56 lb = 25.40 kg
  • 57 lb = 25.85 kg
  • 58 lb = 26.31 kg
  • 59 lb = 26.76 kg
  • 60 lb = 27.22 kg
  • 61 lb = 27.67 kg
  • 62 lb = 28.12 kg
  • 63 lb = 28.58 kg
  • 64 lb = 29.03 kg
  • 65 lb = 29.48 kg
  • 66 lb = 29.94 kg
  • 67 lb = 30.39 kg
  • 68 lb = 30.84 kg
  • 69 lb = 31.30 kg
  • 70 lb = 31.75 kg

Note that 1 pound is about 0.45 kilograms --- or, more precisely, 0.4535924 kilograms.

Choosing string tension is a complicated issue. It depends on the string properties --- but also on the racquet used and the style-and-capabilites of the player.

It comes down to the player simply experimenting with combinations of racquets and strings and string-tensions.

    In tennis circles, there is a lot of talk about 'power' versus 'control' when choosing strings (and racquets).

    When they talk of 'power' they usually are referring to the 'trampoline' effect --- the ball 'springing' off of the racquet strings.

    When they talk of 'control' they usually are referring to the 'non-trampoline' effect --- relatively little 'cupping' of racquet strings around the ball.

    But in some cases, the word 'control' can also get into the topics of 'spin' and 'trajectory' and 'scattering' and 'precise direction'.

    I think the 'power-versus-control' discussion is usually too vague --- and especially puzzling to beginning tennis players.

    The people discussing 'power-versus-control' may know what they mean, but it is seldom the case that they are adequately communicating what they are really thinking in their mind.

    Bottom-line:
    On this page, I avoid using the words 'power' and 'control' and try to convey what I mean in that subject-area by using other words.


String 'Pattern':

Tennis racquets have different string patterns, in particular, a number of 'main' strings and a number of 'cross' strings.

The most common string patterns are 16x19 and 18x20, where the first number is the number of 'mains' and the 2nd number is the number of 'crosses'.

But there are other patterns that have been used in racquets, such as 16x18 and 18x18.

The choice of pattern is actually a subject matter in choosing a racquet --- rather than in choosing a string and string-tension.

BUT, if you are looking for strings that make getting spin easier, it is good to know that the 'word' is that the 16x19 pattern is more spin-friendly than 18x20.


For more info on tennis strings:

There is no lack of words assembled on the subject of tennis strings (and tennis racquets).

The following links can be used to get more info on string behaviors and properties --- properties like stiffness (stretchiness), thickness (gauge), spin-potential, and coefficients-of-friction.

Many of these articles discuss types of strings other than polyester --- such as gut, multifilament, and synthetic gut. But the emphasis of this page will be on polyester strings.

And if these articles are not enough, you can try WEB SEARCHES on keywords such as the following.


Enough of this intro. The strings-menu follows.

Strings Menu:

(links to sections of this page, below)


Note :
You can use a text-search option like 'Find in This Page ...' of your web browser to find keywords on this page, such as

'luxilon'   OR   'solinco'   OR   'babolat'   OR   'technifibre'   OR   'volkl'   OR   'head'   OR   'yonex'

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Start of Tennis-String sections.

3-SIDED Tennis Strings

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4-SIDED Tennis Strings

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5-SIDED Tennis Strings

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6-SIDED Tennis Strings

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7-SIDED Tennis Strings

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8-SIDED Tennis Strings

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OTHER-SHAPES Tennis Strings

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Tennis STRING INFO
(including database finder-utilities
using properties like material,
stretchiness-lb/inch,
tension-loss-percent,
spin-potential, etc.)

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String Search Tools:

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'String Performance Database Reporter' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ reporter2.php
    (Specify up to about 22 properties to show AND specify sort order.
    Then click 'Get Report' button.
    Defaults to show stiffness, tension-loss-percent, & spin-potential
    for 'Polyester' strings & a 'reference tension' & swing-speed.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'Similar Strings Tool' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ similarstrings.php
    (Select a string from a huge list. Then a list of about a dozen similar strings is shown.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'String Stiffness Tool' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ stringstiffnesstool.php
    (Allows you to sort a huge list of strings in either
    descending or ascending order
    by stiffness-lbs/inch = 'stretchiness'.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) String 'Spin Potential Tool' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ spinpotentialtool.php
    (Allows you to sort a huge list of strings in either
    descending or ascending order
    by spin-potential, which is the ratio of
    string-on-ball coefficient of friction, SB-COF, divided by string-on-string coefficient of friction, SS-COF.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'String-on-Ball Friction Tool' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ ballfrictiontool.php
    (Allows you to sort a huge list of strings in either
    descending or ascending order
    by string-on-ball coefficient of friction, SB-COF.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'String-on-String Friction Tool' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ stringfrictiontool.php
    (Allows you to sort a huge list of strings in either
    descending or ascending order
    by string-on-string coefficient of friction, SS-COF.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'String Finder' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ stringfinder/ properties.php
    (Allows you to sort a huge list of strings in order by any of 8 different properties:
    Arm-Friendly, Control, Power, Spin-Potential, Alphabetical, Material, Color, or Gauge.)

  • Tennis Warehouse University (TWU) 'Compare Strings Tool' - at
    twu.tennis-warehouse.com/ learning_center/ comparestrings.php
    (Select String1 & String2 from a huge list of strings.
    Shows properties like stiffness & tension-loss side-by-side.)

  • Tennis Warehouse Strings-Page - at
    www.tennis-warehouse.com/ stringcontent.html
    (You can choose to show strings by TYPE - Polyester, Multifilament, Natural Gut, Synthetic Gut -
    or by BRAND - Babolat, Luxilon, Solinco, etc.
    Also shows 'special sales' on strings.)

String articles:

Sample WEB SEARCHES for more String-Info:

PRO STRINGS

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The tennis pro's use a wide variety of strings and string-tensions.

By far, the most popular 'poly' string 'make' used by the pro's is Luxilon.

Some use Luxilon strings in a 'hybrid' string setup, with gut as the other string (Djokovic, Federer, Murray) --- with a slightly different tension on the mains versus the crosses.

But there are many pro's who use a 'full-bed' of poly --- with mains & crosses strung at the same tension.

Some of the more popular 'poly' strings used by pro's are listed below. The list is roughly in order by popularity of the string, circa 2022.

Each string name is a link to a WEB SEARCH for more info on the string --- including info on where you can buy the string and its cost.

The following string specs are taken from the TWU (Tennis Warehouse University) string tools (links in the Intro above).

  • String Stiffness Tool
  • String Spin Potential Tool
  • String-on-Ball Friction Tool
  • String-on-String Friction Tool

To look up specs for a string, a typical string-thickness was used for each string. You can use the TWU tools to see the specs for other string thicknesses.

Since I am mainly interested in using the same poly for mains & crosses (with the option of using 1 piece of string instead of 2; in other words, 2 knots instead of 4), I have compiled the following list of male pro's who use the same poly for mains & crosses and the same (or nearly the same) tension on mains & crosses --- along with the tension they have been reported to use --- in order by last name.

Sources: colinthestringer.com & staleytennis.com (links below)

  • Roberto Bautista Agut - Luxilon Big Banger Original - 57 lbs

  • Tomas Berdych - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 55 lbs

  • Matteo Berretini - Signum Pro Firestorm 125 - 59.5 lbs (27 kg)

  • Alex De Minaur - Luxilon 4G Rough 125 - 52 lbs

  • David Ferrer - Luxilon Big Banger Original - 51 lbs

  • Fabio Fognini - Babolat RPM Blast 130 - 55 lbs

  • Richard Gasquet - Luxilon Big Banger Original - 58 lbs

  • David Goffin - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 48 lbs

  • John Isner - Technifibre Pro Red Code - 62 lbs (28 kg)

  • Nick Kyrgios - Yonex Poly Tour Pro 125 - 51 lbs (23.1 kg)

  • Juan Martin del Potro - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 62 lbs (28 kg)

  • Daniil Medvedev - Technifibre Ice Code 125 - 49 lbs

  • John Millman - Technifibre Black Code 128 - 68 lbs

  • Gael Monfils - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 57 lbs mains & 55 lbs crosses

  • Rafael Nadal - Babolat RPM Blast 130 - 55 lbs (25 kg)

  • David Nalbandian - Luxilon Big Banger Original - 64 lbs

  • Benoit Paire - Luxilon ALU Power - 53 lbs

  • Tommy Robredo - Luxilon Big Banger Original - 52 lbs

  • Andrey Rublev - Luxilon Adrenaline - 58 lbs

  • Diego Schwartzman - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 50 lbs (22.3 kg)

  • Denis Shapovalov - Yonex Poly Tour Strike - 51 lbs

  • Robin Soderling - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 56 lbs

  • Sefanos Tsitsipas - Luxilon 4G 125 - 55 lbs mains & 53 lbs crosses

And among the women:

  • Ashleigh Barty - Head Hawk Touch - 46 lbs mains & 44 lbs crosses

  • Belinda Bencic - Yonex Poly Tour HS 125 - ? lbs

  • Eugenie Bouchard - Babolat RPM Blast - 49 lbs

  • Simona Halep - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 55 lbs mains & 53 lbs crosses

  • Petra Kvitova - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 57 lbs mains & 53 lbs crosses

  • Garbine Muguruza - Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power - 60 lbs (27.2 kg)

  • Samantha Stosur - Babolat RPM Blast - 49 lbs

For more information on strings of tennis professionals, you can try the article
Pro player strings from Atlanta ATP (2022 Jul 27)
at 'tennisnerd.net'.

Or try the article Pro Player String Tensions
at 'tennisnerd.net'.

Or try the article Tennis Pros & Their Strings
at 'colinthestringer.com'.

Or try the article Top 50 ATP Players Strings
at 'tennispredict.com'.

Or try ATP and WTA player tennis strings
at 'tennisthis.com'.

Or try Pro's Choices: Tennis Racquets, Strings & Tensions (2020 Sep)
at 'staleytennis.com'.

And if these articles are not enough, you can try WEB SEARCHES on keywords such as the following.

Bottom of this
Tennis Strings for Spin page.

To return to a previously visited web page location, click on the Back button of your web browser, a sufficient number of times.

OR, use the History-list option of your web browser.

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Page history:

Page was created 2022 Jul 27.

Page was changed 2022 Aug 05.
(Added sections on string 'Stiffness' & 'Spin Potential' to the Introduction.
Added stiffness & spin-potential numbers below each string-link.
Added some Tennis-Warehouse & WEB-SEARCH links to the String-Info section.)

Page was changed 2022 Aug 08.
(Added SB-COF & SS-COF data for the listed strings.)

Page was changed 2022 Aug 16.
(Added lots of text to the 'Intro' section.
Added the 'Strings of the Pros' section.)

Page was changed 2022 Aug 17.
(Added a list of strings-with-properties & a list of players-and-strings to the 'Strings of the Pros' section.)